Tanya receives keys to her new car from Car Ministry Volunteer Larry Jordan. Tanya will now be able to take her daughter to monthly doctor’s appointments without depending on family members.

The frigid winter morning you dash to your SUV only to find the battery is dead; or the afternoon you’re running late for your child’s swim practice and see smoke billowing from your sedan’s hood — these are the rare moments when many of us stop taking our cars for granted.

For most Northern Virginians, cars are the literal engines that propel their busy lives. But for those who don’t have them, especially if they are low income, day-to-day obligations can be daunting.

“Having a car means being a reliable employee; it means the ability to go to the grocery store and bring home a reasonable amount of food instead of hauling bags onto multiple buses; it means getting to doctors’ appointments and afterschool activities,” said Sally O’Dwyer, director of volunteers for diocesan Catholic Charities. “Without a car, all of this is challenging.”

Continue reading about this important ministry and the clients transformed by it at The Arlington Catholic Herald. Reprinted with permission.

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